8th International Conference on Information Law and Ethics
Modern Intellectual Property Governance and Openness in Europe:
A Long and Winding Road?
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Keynote Speakers

Drahos Peter

Drahos Peter

Professor
European University Institute

Paper: Capitalism’s Governance of Knowledge: Models of Closure, Openness and Defiance.
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Peter Drahos is Professor of Law and Governance in the Law Department at the European University Institute. He holds a Chair in Intellectual Property at Queen Mary, University of London. He is a member of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. He holds degrees in law, politics and philosophy and is admitted as a barrister and solicitor. He has published in law and social science journals on a variety of topics including contract, legal philosophy, telecommunications, intellectual property, trade negotiations and international business regulation. His most recent book is an edited collection entitled Regulatory Theory: Foundations and Applications (ANU Press, 2017).


Paper: Capitalism’s Governance of Knowledge: Models of Closure, Openness and Defiance.
Capitalism’s governance of knowledge appears pluralistic. There are many different and nuanced models for rewarding and diffusing the production of new knowledge. Open access publishing comes in almost as many flavours as one finds in a gelato bar. Access movements, especially in public health have had some success in modifying the worst effects of closed models such as those to be found in the patent system. Traditional knowledge is being integrated into intellectual property systems, albeit haltingly and with much debate. Capitalism also appears to accommodate a degree of non-compliance or defiance from non-paying users of propertized knowledge. In light of this pluralism should we continue to worry about the extension of intellectual property rights?


Updated:30-05-2018 16:21



Dusollier Severine

Dusollier Severine

Professor
SciencesPo Law School

Paper: Towards inclusive properties
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Severine Dusollier is a Professor at SciencesPo Law School where she teaches intellectual property and heads the Master in Innovation Law. She was a research associate at the University of California, Berkeley in 2001, a Jean Monnet fellow at the European University Institute of Florence (Italy) in 2005-2006, a Fellow of the Kernochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts at the University of Columbia in New York in 2011, and a Fellow at NYU in 2017. She is a member of the Belgian Council of Intellectual Property. Her current research relates to intellectual property, copyright and mainly on IP limitations, the public domain and the commons. She is particularly interested in the deviations of the traditional IP models, such as the shift from exclusivity to its subversion or dilution, or the transformation of the unique and self-contained authorship to connected multiple authors. Severine Dusollier got awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant (2014-2019) on the topic of inclusive rights in property and intellectual property.


Paper: Towards inclusive properties
Intellectual property is generally portrayed as granting exclusive rights to forbid anyone to exploit and use the work, invention or mark. Yet, there are many models and ways of exercising such exclusivity in IP, from public domain and limitations to open licensing or collaborative creation. In the many spaces of inclusivity so created, innovation and creation thrive. So isn't it time to open our visions of what intellectual property is and to unthrone its exclusivity ? What about acknowledging that property is a continuum of exclusivity and inclusivity? Renouncing to exclude others and sharing the development and use of intangible creation could be recognised by law as one mode of property. That would require to alter our view of exclusivity as the core component of property and to imagine or adapt rules in intellectual property to accommodate the many shades of inclusivity... and to invent a new legal notion.


Updated:30-05-2018 16:24



Hugenholtz Bernt

Hugenholtz Bernt

Professor
University of Amsterdam

Paper: Reconstructing EU Copyright Law. Five Ways of Making Copyright in Europe More Flexible
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Bernt Hugenholtz is Professor Information Law, in particular in the area of intellectual property law at the Faculty of Law of the University of Amsterdam and former Director of the Institute for Information Law. Bernt Hugenholtz is General Editor of the Information Law Series published by Kluwer Law International. Between 2000-2015 he was a member of the “Commissie Auteursrecht”, that advised the Minister of Justice of the Netherlands on copyright law issues. Besides his academic activities, he has been a practicing lawyer (later partner) at Stibbe in Amsterdam (1990-1998). Since 2003 he has been a judge at the Appeal Court in Arnhem. He is also a Guest Professor at the University of Bergen, Norway (UiB) and at the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center.


Paper: Reconstructing EU Copyright Law. Five Ways of Making Copyright in Europe More Flexible
The need for making copyright law in the EU more open and flexible is nowadays generally acknowledged in academic scholarship. There is however little consensus on the normative underpinnings of a more open EU copyright law, nor on how to design a more flexible structure of EU copyright. Drawing in part from the Reconstructing Rights research project that was recently completed, this keynote discusses various models of reconstructing EU copyright in a more flexible manner. Potential panelists from the Brussels environs might include: Marie-Christine Janssens (Leuven), Alain Strowel (Louvain), Severine Dusollier (SciencesPo), Daniel Gervais (UvA), Martin Senftleben (VU Amsterdam). Please note that Severine and Alain were both directly involved in the Reconstructing Rights project. You might also consider inviting Koen Lenaerts (CJEU and KU Leuven) and someone from the European Commission’s Copyright Unit (DG Connect), preferably Marco Giorello.


Updated:30-05-2018 16:26



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